Ferguson Is Your Future Too

(I wish I could say I wrote this, but alas! This post is the work of the Institute’s Cherubic Adonis, the victim of a particularly nasty tech issue.)

This is your future, America. The events in Ferguson, Missouri are a symptom of a broken country. You know it’s broken. You see the damage and you look the other way because it isn’t your children who are being killed at a frightening pace by authority figures in our society. But one day soon, it will be you and your children who are the victims. They will be drawn into the battle on one of the two sides.

Either all Americans share certain “inalienable rights” or none of us do. The problem stems from your own inability to address the 800 pound gorilla in the room. Prejudice. Now, when I say prejudice, I don’t automatically mean race, but racial prejudice is a big part of the problem. People can be prejudiced in any number of ways. Political prejudice (left vs right), economic prejudice (rich vs poor), intellectual prejudice (intellectual elites vs common man), sexual prejudice (men vs women) are all equally as bad for our national health. Until we, as a society, recognize that we all have value, none of us will really be worth a damn.

Local police forces are now paramilitary units who use counterinsurgency and urban-warfare doctrine to establish control of their areas of operation at any cost. Now, I realize that many people will read this and say, “Oh, you’re exaggerating. This is an isolated incident” but is it really? Take a look and you’ll see that these atrocities occur with staggering regularity in America. Some folks think that this squall will pass (and they may be right), but I guarantee you one thing, this storm isn’t over.

Looking the other way when someone’s rights are being violated doesn’t strengthen your rights. It weakens them. Sooner or later you or people like you are going to become very upset about something (perhaps a big gubmint takeover of *insert cause here*) and they are going to go to the streets because of it. When they do they are going to find out what many minorities in America already know: America does not care about you. America cares about its image and it won’t tolerate you making it look bad on the news. America is a sixteen-year-old girl taking a selfie. America is a self-absorbed douchebag talking into their Bluetooth in the checkout line at the grocery store. America will step over your bleeding (and maybe dead) carcass on its way into a Starbucks to get their caffeine fix. America only cares about America. You aren’t America. America isn’t you. You have become a cog in a machine and if you get worn out or break down, it won’t matter. The machine will continue grinding away. Today it’s Ferguson, Missouri, but soon it will be YourTown, USA. It won’t be fair. It will hurt.  You’ll whine about it and maybe your friends and relatives will be killed or maimed by the “authorities” but don’t expect anyone else to care, because you don’t care right now. In fact, expect people to giggle with glee at your misfortune. Expect to be made into a meme. Expect to be shot through the door when you ring the doorbell and cry for help. Expect to be exploited, first as political fodder and then as comedy, because that’s what America does.

I leave you with an old quote about America by Carl Schurz, “My country right or wrong.” Most people have heard it before but that’s not the whole quote. The whole statement reads, “My country right or wrong; if right to be kept right; and if wrong, to be set right.” Until we are all prepared to set America right when it is wrong there won’t be any right to celebrate.

The AMA is Wrong

A few weeks ago, the American Medical Association voted to declare obesity a disease.

…members of the AMA’s House of Delegates rejected cautionary advice from their own experts and extended the new status to a condition that affects more than one-third of adults and 17% of children in the United States.

Why, I wondered, would the esteemed AMA reject cautionary advice from their own experts about declaring obesity a disease?

There may be several reasons, and sadly, not one of them get to the crux of the matter.

With so many people qualifying as “obese,” there’s money to be made with this classification. If you have a disease, you need to be treated.

As is, the diet industry is already making money hand over fist, with few success stories The lack of success stories is due to the fact diets don’t work. Long-term, meaningful changes MAY work. But cutting caloric intake, reaching a goal weight, and then resuming normal eating habits is a recipe for failure in keeping weight off.

Instead, the US spends over 60 BILLION dollars a year on dieting.

$60,000,000,000.

The lack of success stories is telling: it’s our culture. It’s the priorities. It’s the fact that it’s a lot cheaper for most families to buy processed foods than it is for them to buy fresh fruits, vegetables, fresh meats, etc.

But that the AMA ignored the advice of experts and declared obesity is darker and more sinister. It’s about the money for Big Pharma. After all, now that obesity is an illness, pharmaceutical companies can start making more medicines to “treat” the new “illness.”

Via:

It’s inaccurate:

It distracts from the real issues:

It’s a win for the weight cycling industry

Unfortunately, what’s good for the weight cycling industry isn’t necessarily good for patients: 

This new categorization has an interesting “benefit”–the ACA (aka “Obamacare”) will cover treatments for obesity.

But even that’s a very questionable “benefit.” This still seems, once again, to be all about the money.

If we, as a society, wanted to address obesity, we’d quench the many food deserts within our country. We’d make fresher, healthier foods cheaper. It still costs more to buy bananas, broccoli, or apples than it does to buy a box of Mac n’ Cheese. We would stop blaming people for being obese and realize that there are many reasons why some people are heavier than others.

We also wouldn’t equate thin with good health.  This is one of the most harmful lies we tell ourselves, at least in my opinion.

But hey, it’s all about the Benjamin’s (or Franklin’s, thanks DH!) in the end, right?